Re: Fred Flintstone Can’t Be Happy About This

From a Highland Park High School student in reponse to my Mr. Flintstone post this morning.

Merritt, Didn’t you listen to music your parents didn’t approve of? I’m sure you can find some of our music to support.

First, aren’t you in school right now? Listen to your teacher. But I do get your point. I semi-like your generation’s love sick crackhead stuff (even though it’s Kesha) and I can handle Replay but I hate the part that goes “who would ever have knew” for obvious reasons. Here’s the problem with your people, the videos.

You don’t know a good video when you see one. Once you’ve done some research in the field of good music videos, call me. But make sure you check out the right pieces, even if they make you giggle.

10 thoughts on “Re: Fred Flintstone Can’t Be Happy About This

  • March 31, 2010 at 2:28 pm
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    It’s a little ironic that you would dismiss the music of this generation, regardless of it’s morality, and seek to replace it with videos of whitesnake, def leppard, and right said fred. None of your alternatives were certainly champions of “appropriate” videos or lyrics (both of which you have been critical of) and all were extremely provocative in their day.

    If you’re going to be critical of music now it might be a good idea to be critical of music then. At least, that is, if you’re wanting to remain objective.

    If you’re just going for irony. Well, then, congratulations.

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  • March 31, 2010 at 2:29 pm
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    Merritt used to do a KILLER Samantha Fox (“Touch Me, Touch Me Now”…NOTHING objectionable about that song) in 1987, but she really riffed doing the frog croaking parts on “Living on a Prayer” (Bon Jovi…). IJS.

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  • March 31, 2010 at 2:34 pm
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    @amanda, You must have forgotten my totally mad Debbie Gibson skills.

    @Jon W., You’re getting warm with the whole irony thing.

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  • March 31, 2010 at 2:57 pm
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    Loved taking that walk down memory lane, Merritt! The difference is that I wasn’t listening to/singing those songs in the car with my parents like the kids do now, and I wouldn’t have wanted to. I listened to those songs in my room with the door closed or in my car. I remember when I was younger thinking the Hall & Oates song “Rich Girl” was so bad because it used the “B” word, and I would feel a little awkward if it played on the radio when I was with my parents. Things have certainly changed since then!

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  • March 31, 2010 at 2:58 pm
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    ha.

    Glad I can still pick up on literary irony.

    That sentence is more awkward to say than type.

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  • March 31, 2010 at 3:20 pm
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    @Jon W. the real irony is that this generation’s music is the same as the last generation’s music which was the same as the last generation’s. There hasn’t been anything new, lyrically speaking, since rock n roll first hit the scene in the 50’s.

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  • March 31, 2010 at 8:20 pm
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    “First, aren’t you in school right now? Listen to your teacher.”

    High school students tell me that the teachers aren’t listening either. Instead many are emailing and texting and paying little attention to the students. They may still be hard graders, so the students aren’t off the hook, and some may use their modern technology to cheat, as Matt commented on a recent post.

    Most of my teachers had class discussions and circulated to help students with assignments. Their phone calls waited for free period, in the office or the lounge. The years have added distractions for all in the classrooms.

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  • April 1, 2010 at 9:07 am
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    I listened to Led Zeppelin and Jethro Tull. ‘Nuff said.

    But that doesn’t mean I surrender my God-given adult right to criticize my own kids’ music.

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  • April 1, 2010 at 10:17 am
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    I totally missed your Debbie Gibson phase. *tear*

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