Should Dallas Fight For Apples Instead of Arenas?

Forbes has an interesting article, posted Friday, that argues that instead of spending taxpayer money wooing stadiums, cities should instead fight for Apple stores.

The shops have become “anchors for affluent areas,” and promote more economic growth than stadiums, which often just encourage growth between and around their seats.

Dallas has two Apple stores (McKinney Avenue and NorthPark, plus another in Plano), falling behind New York (5, tied for most in the world with London), Los Angeles, San Francisco, Miami, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh (surprisingly) and Honolulu (incredibly surprising).

In Texas, Houston has three shops, San Antonio two, and Austin two. I can’t fathom how much good an Apple store on Lower Henderson or Deep Ellum would help stabilize those shops, though I may be in the minority among my friends in that respect.

Small businesses are important, but I think an anchor like Apple could help some of those shops flourish, and stick around.

10 thoughts on “Should Dallas Fight For Apples Instead of Arenas?

  • December 12, 2011 at 7:33 pm
    Permalink

    The apple stores have all gone in areas that were affluent already – that’s the whole reason locations have been attractive to apple in the first place.

    Reply
  • December 12, 2011 at 8:53 pm
    Permalink

    TiB took the words right out of my mouth. Tail wagging the dog.

    Reply
  • December 12, 2011 at 9:30 pm
    Permalink

    Also Apple Stores in Frisco and Southlake

    Reply
  • December 13, 2011 at 9:03 am
    Permalink

    maybe the lake highlands towncenter

    Reply
  • December 13, 2011 at 9:26 am
    Permalink

    The first two comments are right on the money: Apple stores go to areas that are already affluent. On the other hand, American Airlines Center was built in an economic wasteland of an area that is now a thriving, affluent enclave. I think what scares Forbes is that some taxpayer money must go into the creation of an arena, even though it is recouped many times over.

    Reply
  • December 13, 2011 at 10:13 am
    Permalink

    How much improved would the Fair Park area be if Laura Miller and “Judge” Margaret Kelleher had not prevented the Cowboys from building their stadium there? Why do cities not think twice about giving businesses tax breaks to move their headquarters to their city, but they go all up in arms about spending money for a stadium that brings life and vibrancy to the area? It’s little wonder that downtown Dallas is an unsafe ghost town at night.

    Reply
  • December 13, 2011 at 10:23 am
    Permalink

    AAC area now thriving? @Charles, don’t know when the last time you were down there, but it’s a wasteland unless there is a Mavs or Stars game or Concert. Numerous retail and restaurants have failed in the area. It was not a bad place to put the Arena, but subsequent development efforts have not been successful.

    Reply
  • December 13, 2011 at 1:03 pm
    Permalink

    UPDad, Laura Miller told Jerry that that Dallas could do his stadium deal at Fair Park and Jerry imediately said no because he said his sponsors would not go to Fair Park. The deal made much more sense for Dallas financially at Fair Park than the original site Jerry suggested on South Industrial. There are 5 Apple stores in the Dallas area with Northpark,Knox,Willow Bend, Stonebrier and Southlake.

    Reply
  • December 13, 2011 at 3:15 pm
    Permalink

    MGBHStar,

    I understand that many businesses have closed around the AAC, but, in general, this area is light years ahead of where it was before 2000. Remember, it was an industrial wasteland then, and now there is construction all around it. I suppose one could make the argument that the area would have grown even without the AAC, but I don’t believe it.

    Reply
  • December 14, 2011 at 11:55 pm
    Permalink

    At an SMU lunch last year, Jerry himself said that Laura Miller told him to go build the stadium in Arlington. I don’t know why he would make that up, what he has to gain from that? The bottom line is that like any businessman, he needed to make the best deal he could. Arlington wanted it. Miller was a long-time vocal opponent to taxes funding any portion of a stadium. The Cowboys continued discussions well after Fair Park was brought up as a preferred location by the city, but they needed a referendum on a ballot at the next election, and Miller and Kelliher adamantly refused, so the Cowboys had to move on. Beside what Jones had to say at that luncheon last year, these facts are supported by news reports at the time from the Dallas Morning News.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Greenhill Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *